North America

Working in nearly 100 communities across North America, URI Cooperation Circles are bringing together people from across traditions to create social change.

North America: interfaith celebration

Cooperation Circles in the URI North America region are based in the United States and Canada. They provide support for the poor and homeless; mobilize interfaith communities to engage in environmental issues like climate change, energy conservation, and renewable energy; address gang violence and the need for safe after-school programs in low-income communities; and build interfaith understanding and cooperation in communities with growing numbers of religious minorities.

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Regional Support Staff

  • Sari Heidenreich, Regional Coordinator
  • Jaya Reinhalter, Coordinator for US Western States

Learn more about our interns and Regional Leadership Team, the URI North America Leadership Council.

Click here to sign up to receive email updates from the URI North America region and to see previous issues of the newsletter.


Here’s one example of URI’s work in this region:

When the governor of Tennessee stated that he did not want refugees to resettle in his state, the Northeast Tennessee Chapter URI Cooperation Circle joined a chorus of voices to express their support for refugee rights. They published an advertisement in their local newspaper and declared, “Let us all speak out against religious, racial and ethnic animosity and encourage all people to compassionately welcome.” A few months later, the governor reversed his position.

Search for Cooperation Circles (CCs) in North America

Stories From URI North America

Making Sense of Copenhagen

The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, in December 2009, has come and gone. How to interpret its impact is the question?  Pessimistic voices declare that its goal of a binding agreement among nations failed miserably and that the venue of small and large nations together was far too unwieldy to arrive at a meaningful conclusion.  Optimistic voices are cheered that it happened at all.  That leading polluting nations arrived at a common intent to change and that Copenhagen represented only one stop on a long road, whose next steps are Mexico (2010) and beyond until a binding agreement is achieved.

A Climate Change Call to Action

The Global Council of the United Religions Initiative (URI) concurs with some 500 leaders of major faith communities of the world who, when gathered at the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Melbourne, Australia, in December 2009, issued a statement that “recognized that climate change is the single most important issue presently confronting us and all on Earth.”